Volvo s60 Gen 1 buying advice and problems

In 2000, we waved goodbye to the Volvo S70 and welcomed the Volvo S60 Gen 1. This model came up with a lot of innovations and advantages over its predecessor. The design of the S60 Gen 1 was fresh and modern, with a more refined interior. The model also had all kinds of new safety features, such as a better braking system, side airbags, and a system to protect you from whiplash. Overall, the S60 Gen 1 received high praise from users and experts alike, mainly because of how nice it drives, its comfort and safety. But there were some people who felt that the car was rather gas-guzzling compared to other cars in the same class. Such as the BMW 3 series e90/91. Those were much more economical.

volvo s60 gen 1 buying advice and problems

S60 Gen 1 Facelift from 2005 onwards

In 2005, the S60 Gen 1 got a refresh, with a new front end, some modifications to the rear, and an update to the interior. This model was produced from 2000 to 2009. This includes the engines that were available for the S60 Gen 1:

  • 2.0T: 163 hp, 230 Nm torque, 1984 cc
  • 2.0T: 180 hp, 240 Nm of torque, 1984 cc
  • 2.4: 140 hp, 220 Nm torque, 2435 cc
  • 2.4T: 200 hp, 300 Nm of torque, 2435 cc
  • 2.4D: 163 hp, 340 Nm torque, 2401 cc
  • D5: 163 hp, 340 Nm torque, 2401 cc
  • D5: 185 hp, 400 Nm of torque, 2401 cc

There have been some known problems with the S60 Gen 1's engines, from oil leaks to turbo issues. There have also been general trouble spots, such as electrical problems, suspension problems, brake problems and transmission problems.

Below are the specific problems per engine

For the different engine options of the S60 Gen 1, there are specific problems that can occur:

  • 2.0T: In this engine, oil leaks often occur at the camshaft seals and the turbocharger oil supply line. Further, the engine can sometimes falter and idle erratically due to faulty ignition coils and spark plugs.
  • 2.4: This engine may develop oil leaks at the front crankshaft seal and oil pan gasket. It may also have problems with the PCV system, causing excessive oil consumption and irregular idling.
  • 2.4T: The turbocharger of this engine may malfunction, leading to power loss and excessive smoke from the exhaust. As with the 2.0T, oil leaks may also occur at the camshaft seals and the turbocharger's oil supply line.
  • 2.4D/D5: The S60 Gen 1's diesel engines can experience problems with the fuel injectors, which can cause hiccups and loss of power. There can also be problems with the EGR valve and turbocharger, which can cause power loss and too much smoke from the exhaust.

What to look out for when buying a Volvo S60?

If you have your eye on an S60 Gen 1, there are a few things to consider. Check the car carefully for signs of wear and tear, such as scratches, dents and rust. Take a test drive to feel how the car drives, and listen carefully if you feel any strange noises or vibrations. Check the engine for leaks and strange smells, take a good lamp with you to detect any leaks. Check that the oil has been changed on time and the timing belt replaced according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Check the brakes, suspension and tyres for wear and whether all electronics are working. It is also smart to check the history of the car, whether any recalls are outstanding, for example. Negotiate the price well and put everything in writing before you buy the car. Following these tips will help you make a good decision when buying a Volvo S60. You can download our checklist for free.

Mercedes E class w212 buying advice and problems

The Mercedes E-Class W212 is a luxury sedan and estate that belongs to the higher-end cars. The car was produced from 2009 to 2016 and was available in several engine variants, both petrol and diesel. The new prices of the Mercedes E-Class W212 varied depending on the engine and version chosen, but were between €50,000 and €150,000 in the Netherlands. The car is known for its luxurious appearance, comfortable driving experience and excellent safety features.

mercedes e class w212

Engine variants

The Mercedes E-Class W212 is available in several engine variants, both petrol and diesel. The diesel variants range from 2.1 CDI to 3.0 CDI. Petrol variants range from 1.8 CGI to 5.5 AMG. A total of nine different engine variants are available.

Fuel consumption

The fuel consumption of the Mercedes E-Class W212 varies depending on the chosen engine and driving style. The 2.1 CDI has an average fuel consumption of 5.3 litres per 100 km, while the 5.5 AMG has an average fuel consumption of 12.2 litres per 100 km.

Safety score

The Mercedes E-Class W212 has a safety score of 5 stars according to NCAP. The car has excellent safety equipment, including airbags, ABS, electronic stability control and brake assist. Here is the link to the page: https://www.euroncap.com/nl/results/mercedes-benz/e-class/40875

Common problems

Common problems with the Mercedes E-Class W212 include problems with the air conditioning, problems with the automatic gearbox and problems with the electronics. Rust can also occur in older models and there can be oil consumption problems in some engine variants.

Competitors

Competitors of the Mercedes E-Class W212 in the same price segment are the BMW 5-series and the Audi A6. Both cars offer similar performance and luxury.

Conclusion

The Mercedes E-Class W212 is a luxury car with several engine variants and a good safety rating. Common problems can be prevented by regular maintenance. Competitors in the same price segment are the BMW 5-series and the Audi A6.

Advantages:

  • Luxurious and comfortable car
  • Different engine variants available
  • Good safety score

Disadvantages:

  • Possible problems with air conditioning, automatic transmission and electronics
  • Higher fuel consumption on some engine variants

Audi a6 c6 2004-2011 buying advice and problems

If you are looking for a luxury car with plenty of space and comfort, the Audi A6 C6 is a good choice. The A6 C6 was produced between 2004 and 2011 and is available in several engine variants, both petrol and diesel. In this buying advice, we discuss the different variants, fuel consumption, the safety score according to NCAP, common problems and competitors with similar prices.

audi a6 c6 buying advice

Engine variants

The Audi A6 C6 is available in several engine variants, ranging from 2.0 TFSI to 5.2 FSI. Diesel variants range from 2.0 TDI to 3.0 TDI. The 2.0 TFSI and 2.0 TDI are the most popular variants and are available in both sedan and Avant versions.

Fuel consumption

The fuel consumption of the Audi A6 C6 varies depending on the engine chosen and driving style. The 2.0 TFSI has an average fuel consumption of 8.5 litres per 100 km, while the 2.0 TDI has an average fuel consumption of 6.5 litres per 100 km. The 3.0 TDI has an average fuel consumption of 7.5 litres per 100 km.

Problems by engine variant

Below is the complete list of common problems by engine variant of the Audi A6 C6:

2.0 TFSI

  • Oil pump problems
  • Distribution chain problems
  • Problems with the ignition coils
  • Problems with the turbo

2.0 TDI

  • Problems with the EGR valve
  • Problems with the turbo
  • Distribution chain problems
  • Fuel pump problems

2.4 FSI

  • Distribution chain problems
  • Camshaft adjuster problems
  • Problems with the EGR valve

2.7 TDI

  • Problems with the turbo
  • Problems with the EGR valve
  • Air intake problems

3.0 TDI

  • Problems with the EGR valve
  • Problems with the turbo
  • Camshaft adjuster problems
  • Distribution chain problems

3.2 FSI

  • Distribution chain problems
  • Oil pump problems
  • Camshaft adjuster problems

It is important to remember that these are only common problems and not all cars will suffer from them. It is also important to carry out regular maintenance to prevent or correct these problems in time. And see maintenance bills at the time of purchase. Booklets are nice but not hard proof of maintenance done.

Safety score

The Audi A6 C6 has a safety score of 5 stars according to NCAP. The car has excellent safety equipment, including airbags, ABS, electronic stability control and brake assist.

Common problems

A common problem with the Audi A6 C6 is problems with the multitronic automatic transmission. The clutch can also wear out over time and there are problems with the electronics.

Competitors

The Audi A6 C6 has competitors in the same price segment, such as the BMW 5-series and the Mercedes-Benz E-Class. Both cars offer similar performance and luxury, but the Audi A6 C6 has a better safety score and is generally more reliable.

Conclusion

The Audi A6 C6 is a good choice if you are looking for a luxury car with plenty of space and comfort. The car is available in several engine variants and has a good safety rating. Common problems can be prevented by regular maintenance. Competitors in the same price segment are the BMW 5-series and the Mercedes-Benz E-Class, but the Audi A6 C6 has a better safety score and is generally more reliable.

Advantages:

  • Luxurious and comfortable car
  • Available in different engine variants
  • Good safety score

Disadvantages:

  • Multitronic automatic transmission can cause problems
  • Electronics problems can occur
  • Fuel consumption is not the most efficient in its class.

The advantages of a car transporter

As a car enthusiast, you understand how important it is to protect your car and keep it in pristine condition. Whether you are someone who keeps a classic car in storage, or a car collector looking to transport a vehicle across the country, Investing in a car transporter is the best way to ensure your car is safe.

The benefits of a car transporter: why you should consider one as a car enthusiast

With a car transporter, you can transport your car without unnecessary mileage, and protect it from the elements. Moreover, a car transporter can give you peace of mind that the car is safe during transport. Not only that, but car transporters are cost-effective, convenient and can be customised to suit your specific needs. So read on if you are in doubt about buying a car transporter.

What is a car transporter?

car transporterA car transporter is a specialised vehicle with the capacity to transport a single car along with other goods such as tools or spare parts. Most car transporters are equipped with hydraulic ramps to drive the car onto the vehicle, and can be used to transport any vehicle, including classic cars and high-end sports cars. Car transporters are also known as car transporters and car trailers. Car transporters are usually equipped with reinforced axles and heavy-duty suspension.

Advantages of using a car transporter

A car transporter can be a car lover's best friend, and for good reason. Transporting a car with a car transporter can be economical compared to other transportation methods, such as shipping. Transportation by car transporter can save time and money and provide a higher level of protection than shipping. Car transporters can also be used to transport your car to a mechanic for repairs, or to transport a car that is not running to a mechanic for repairs.

Characteristics and adaptability of car transporters

Car transporters are built with very strong materials and are designed to withstand the elements. These materials and strong designs allow them to be used in all weather conditions. You can also customise the car transporter to suit the car or your specific needs.
Car transporters are also highly adaptable. They can be used to transport almost any type of vehicle, such as a car, motorbike, boat, heavy equipment and agricultural machinery. Multifunctional therefore, a buy car transporter so can be a good choice if you often need to transport vehicles, furthermore, you can also buy one to rent it out for example.

 

How can you rent a car cheaply?

In some situations, you need a car or a van, and it should be clear that far from everyone has one in their driveway. Especially in big cities, the percentage of car owners is smaller and many more people use bicycles or public transport.

Fortunately, if you do need a car or van, you can rent one. In every town, there are rental companies you can turn to. Of course, you don't want to pay top dollar for this, so what should you look out for when renting a car or van?

Choose a strategic location

How much you pay for renting a car is determined, among other things, by where you will rent. Are you going to rent a Rent a car in Amsterdam And do you choose a rental company in the middle of the city? Then chances are you will pay more than if you choose a location just outside the city. Of course, this varies per company (and rental chain) but because the rent per m2 in the city centre is higher than for a building just outside the city centre, chances are you will be cheaper outside the city. It is therefore wise to look a little further than the (well-known) landlords in your neighbourhood.

car hireIf you are going to rent a car while travelling, then you should note that rental companies at airports are always a lot more expensive. This can sometimes be as much as 20% more expensive than rental companies outside the airport.

Choose the right car

Of course, what determines the price even more is which car you choose and what options you choose. The bigger or the fancier the model you choose, the higher the price to rent it. So, do you only need a car to get from A to B and no belongings need to be taken in the car? Then it is wise to choose the smallest car and look for one with as few options as possible.

You often pay a lower amount for this, allowing you to spend the rest of your pennies on something else. Sometimes you can also choose to drive a car with advertising stickers, in which case you pay even less than the regular rental prices. Another great way to save money on renting a car. You can ask about it at the car dealer.

When you need a van

Have you taken on a job on a project basis and really need to drive to the customer with tools? Then it's best to opt for a bus. A van rental in Amsterdam again, you can make it as expensive or cheap as you like.

Insurance and other complementary products

Perhaps needless to say but also look critically at the extra costs such as the additional insurances offered. In many cases, the insurances you already have cover the rental vehicle. Think of your personal car insurance or travel insurance, but sometimes this is already included in the insurance linked to your credit card. So this can also save you a lot on the extra costs when renting a car.

Do you have more tips? If so, be sure to let us know via the comment form!

 

Objecting to a speeding fine?

Not paying attention and driving too fast? Before you know it, speeding fines will be on your doorstep. Fines are, of course, very annoying and you often have to dig deep into your pockets for them. However, there is good news, because objecting to speeding fines is always possible. In this article we explain how to proceed and how external parties can help you. And the best part is that it is free of charge for you, so it is definitely worth a try!

I have received a speeding fine, what should I do?

objection to speeding fineIf you speeding fines on the mat then, of course, it is something not to be happy about. You may not even be aware of the offence because you were not behind the wheel when you committed the speeding offence. However, there is little you can do about this because the law states that the owner of the car must pay the traffic fine must pay. This is called licence plate liability. Hopefully you know who committed the offence, so that you can approach them and ask them to pay the fine.

What are the fines for speeding?

Looking purely at exceeding the speed limit, fines are divided into the following categories:

  1. Violating the speed limit in built-up areas
  2. Exceeding the speed limit outside built-up areas
  3. Exceeding the speed limit on motorways

The exact amount of the fines can vary from year to year. The public prosecutor's office publishes the new tariffs annually on their website so that you can calculate for yourself how high the fine will be.

Can I object?

Yes, definitely! In principle, you can always try to object to the speed penalty. You can do this within 6 weeks after the date on which the fine was sent. You can send the letter to the public prosecutor, but nowadays there are also many companies that specialise in making objections against speeding fines. These companies have a lot of experience in making objections and therefore know all the ins and outs. In most cases, these mediators do not ask for a fee and they submit the objection for you free of charge. If they are successful, they receive a fee from the court and are thus still paid. If they are unsuccessful, there is no fee, but in that case the mediator bears the risk and you do not have to pay extra. We think that is a fair and good deal here at Autobaak!

How long will the decision on the objection take?

There are a lot of fines issued and you will understand that the speed fines department is very busy. Especially since the speed limit has been lowered! So it may take some time before you get an answer, according to the CJIB it can take up to 16 weeks. After this, a visit to the court will follow for the final decision. If the objection has been lodged on time and you have received a letter from the mediator/judiciary confirming the decision, the fine is actually on hold and you have to wait for further news. The ball is then no longer in your court and you can wait it out.

Purely for our curiosity, we took a look at the number of speeding fines per year. On the website of the Rijksoverheid the following can be read:

Most traffic fines are imposed for speeding: 6,364,857 in 2020. Most of these traffic violations are detected with digital enforcement tools by license plate. In 2020, 2,803,661 speeding fines were imposed after being checked using a speed camera. In addition, 1,476,304 speeding violations were detected using mobile radar equipment. The total number of speeding violations detected at section controls has risen to 1,963,918.

Does objecting to a speeding fine have any chance of success?

What we have read is that it is certainly useful to object to speeding fines. If we may believe the statistics, one third of all traffic fines that are objected to are imposed unjustly. If the letter from the CJIB falls on your doorstep, there is a 1 in 3 chance that you will be able to successfully contest the fine. If you also know that objecting to the fine is free of charge, we would certainly advise you to take a chance and to call in the help of a party such as Boete Juristen.

Safe on holiday with a trailer

What do you need to consider when driving with a trailer? Whether it's a cart, caravan, folding caravan or trailer; before you start driving there are a few things you need to bear in mind. On this page you will find a list of useful tips before going on holiday with a trailer behind your car.

Checklist for the trailer

  • Is the load properly distributed and secured?
  • Do you have an extra number plate for the trailer?
  • Is the trailer tyre pressure correct?
  • Is the trailer properly hitched and coupled?
  • Is the breakaway cable securely fastened?
  • Does the electrical connection between vehicle and trailer work?
  • Are the trailer lights working?
  • Have you released the handbrake and turned the nose wheel up?
  • Have you adjusted your car's rear-view mirrors properly?
  • Aren't the car's headlights set too high when fully loaded?

Drive with the right towbar

trailer behind the carIf you are travelling with a caravan for the first time and need a new towbar, you can easily buy one online or through a garage and have it installed. Many vehicles are fitted with a towbar as standard, but this is not the case with all cars. A detachable model is also an option and has the advantage that you only attach it as soon as you want to use it. Want more info on a hitch mounting? Then read on this page.

Driving with a trailer: change in driving behaviour

When driving with a trailer for the first time, you will notice a change in driving behaviour. The car is, of course, overall longer, which means that parking has to be done differently. When turning, the car will swerve and also when reversing, you have to practise driving correctly. When it is windy, tall caravans and trailers can catch wind more easily and start to sway. At such times, the motto is to drive carefully and more slowly. The ANWB offers further tips for driving in windy and stormy weather.

Secure the load

It is important to distribute the load on the trailer evenly and secure the load properly with lashing straps and nets to avoid danger to fellow road users (and yourself, of course!). There is no legal obligation to cover all loose cargo. However, you should prevent loose cargo from causing danger or hindrance by the cargo falling off or blowing off. On the government website in article 5.18.6 section 2 of the Vehicles Regulation state the requirements on how to cover cargo:

"Loose load which by its nature cannot be secured to or on the vehicle shall be properly covered if danger or nuisance arises or is likely to arise due to falling or blowing load."

How fast can you drive with a trailer?

And one of the most popular questions: how fast can you go with a trailer? The maximum speed with a trailer depends on the weight of the trailer. Under 3500 kilos, you are allowed to drive 90 kilometres per hour on motorways. When the weight exceeds 3500 kilos, the maximum speed is 80 kilometres per hour.

If you want to drive abroad with a trailer, always enquire in the country concerned about the maximum permitted speed. So if you are going on holiday with a trailer or caravan, it is important to be aware of this and to look it up and check it in advance for each country. Below is a list per country.

Country Maximum permitted mass Permitted speed
Belgium <3500 kg 120 km/h
>3500 kg 90 km/h
Germany - 80 km/h
TUV approved + pace 100 100 km/h
France <3500 kg 130 km/h
<3500 kg and rain 110 km/h
>3500 kg 90 km/h
Luxembourg - 90 km/h
Netherlands <3500 kg 90 km/h
>3500 kg 80 km/h
Austria <750 kg 100 km/h
>750kg and total weight >3500kg 60 km/h
trailer is heavier than car 70 km/h
Portugal - 100 km/h
Spain <750 kg 90 km/h
>750 kg 80 km/h
Switzerland - 80 km/h

Oh yes, what driving licence do you need?

caravan holidaysTo pull a trailer, you need driving licence B, BE or B+. Which driving licence you need for your trailer, caravan or semi-trailer depends on the permitted maximum mass. This is the empty weight plus the maximum load. For example, a trailer may have a maximum permitted mass of 750 kilos. If the trailer itself weighs 150 kilos (empty weight), you may still add 600 kilos of cargo (load capacity). It is therefore not about the actual weight. Check the website of the central government for the official guidelines.

If you follow these tips, you will drive safely on holiday with the trailer behind the car. Enjoy your trip!

Replace front and rear axle drive? What you need to know

Gaiters - you may not hear about them very often. Yet they are very important car parts. Driving around with damaged homokinetic joints can be life-threatening in some cases. What does this car part do? How do you know that it needs to be replaced and how much does it cost to replace a joint pinion? We tell you more!

What are homokinets?

Hubs are also known as pinion joints or homokinetic joints. It is the car part that connects the wheel to the drive shaft. It is an ingeniously designed joint that ensures that the wheels and the axle always rotate at the same speed, even when steering or taking a bumpy sandy road.

The part that often shows defects first is the sleeve that surrounds the homokineet. This shaft sleeve contains grease for the proper, smooth operation of the clutch. When the sleeve is damaged and gets torn, this grease leaks. Dirt also gets into the hub axle.

Crankshaft symptoms in the event of damage

Crank joints broken? The sooner you get there, the better. This will not only save you high maintenance costs, but will also be safer. In order to help you spot defective parts in time, we have listed the damaged joint pin symptoms for you.

Ticking sound when steering

Do you hear a ticking or clicking noise when you steer and accelerate at the same time? There is a good chance that one of the coil joints is broken. When in doubt, find an empty parking space where you have the space to drive in circles in reverse. Accelerate a little at a time. If the ticking gets louder, there is probably a defective axle box.

A grease spot

If the axle cover is damaged, grease will leak out. This grease ends up on the hub axle, the wheels and the tyres. Do you suspect that one of the joints is broken? Then don't conclude that you are wrong, because you don't see a grease spot on the wheels. In the beginning these grease spots are small. Only when the axle cover is damaged further and more grease is leaking, you will see this on the wheels. If there is a large grease spot, the car part is probably already so badly damaged that not only the axle cover, but also the homokineet itself and maybe the drive shaft need to be replaced.

Shock or vibration of the car

Homing joints in good condition ensure that the wheels and axle have the same speed. If a homokinetic clutch is not doing its job properly anymore, this will cause jolting or vibrating. In the beginning, you only notice this when you make a sharp turn and accelerate. The more the car part is damaged, the more severe the jolting and vibrating becomes. Eventually, you will also feel it when driving in a straight line at a constant speed. At this stage, driving with a broken hub cap becomes really dangerous. The joint is so badly damaged that it can now come loose, leaving your wheel disconnected from the axle. Your car becomes uncontrollable.

Replace front drive shaft - the sooner, the better

A seriously damaged axle box causes life-threatening situations on the road. No wonder that a cracked axle cover results in an MOT-approved car. When you hear a ticking or clicking noise for the first time while steering or accelerating, you do not have to take the emergency lane immediately. However, it is important to go to the garage as soon as possible. If you get there quickly, there is a chance that only the axle cover needs to be replaced. This is relatively cheap.

Does the homokineet itself also need to be replaced? That is a more expensive option. Often the axle is also replaced. The axle has to be dismantled anyway to replace the homokinets and often the drive shaft itself is also worn out. To prevent having to go to the garage again within six months, it is best to buy a completely new driveshaft. Sometimes you have no choice. Not all drive shafts are supplied separately. They are only for sale as part of the drive shaft. Since replacing the complete driveshaft is a very expensive undertaking, many people choose to get rid of their car.

Camshaft replacement costs

Replacing the axle cover of a joint pin usually costs between 90 and 150 euros. Replacing a single drive pinion joint costs between 400 and 750 euros. Replacing a drive shaft costs between 430 and 1200 euros, and replacing both drive shafts can cost between 760 and 2200 euros.

The large price differences for the same repairs are related to the cost of parts for specific car makes and models, but also to the workshop's labour costs.

When to replace a Renault timing belt

When to replace a Renault timing belt

Renault has a wide variety of models and engines, most of which are equipped with a timing belt. Over the years there have been many differences in when a Renault timing belt needs to be replaced. Choose your type and model from the list below. If you are not sure which engine your Renault has, fill in the registration number below. You will then get an overview of all the specifications of the car.

Choose your Renault and see timing belt replacement

Audi TT

When to replace the Audi TT timing belt

The Audi TT is Audi's sports coupé and has been on the market since 1999. This model comes with both petrol and diesel engines. Below is the overview of the timing belt replacement interval. If you don't know which engine your car has, you can enter the registration number below.

Petrol variants manufactured between 1999 and 2006

  • Audi TT 1.8 T (up to 2001) = 180 000 Kilometres or up to 5 years;
  • Audi TT 1.8 T (from 2001) = 180 000 Kilometre;
  • Audi TT 1.8 T quattro (until 2001) = 180 000 Kilometres or up to 5 years;
  • Audi TT 1.8 T quattro (from 2001) = 180 000 Kilometre;
  • Audi TT 3.2 VR6 quattro = Timing chain.

Petrol variants produced between 2006 and 2014

  • Audi TT 1.8 TFSI = Timing chain;
  • Audi TT 2.0 TFSI BWA = 180 000 Kilometre;
  • Audi TT 2.0 TFSI BPY = 210 000 Kilometre;
  • Audi TT 2.0 TFSI CCTA = Timing chain;
  • Audi TT 2.0 TFSI CCZA = Timing chain;
  • Audi TT 2.0 TFSI quattro 147W = Timing chain;
  • Audi TT 2.0 TFSI quattro 155W = Timing chain;
  • Audi TT 2.0 TFSI quattro 200W = 180 000 kilometres;
  • Audi TT 2.0 TTS quattro = 180 000 kilometres;
  • Audi TT 2.5 RS quattro = Timing chain;
  • Audi TT 2.5 TFSI quattro = Timing chain;
  • Audi TT 3.2 V6 quattro = Timing chain.

Diesel variants produced between 2006 and 2014:

  • Audi TT 2.0 TDI quattro (up to 2010) = 180 000 kilometres;
  • Audi TT 2.0 TDI quattro (from 2010) = 210 000 kilometres.

Petrol variants produced from 2014 onwards

  • Audi TT 2.0 TFSI = Timing chain;
  • Audi TT 2.0 TFSI quattro = Timing chain;
  • Audi TT 2.0 TTS quattro = Timing chain.

Diesel variants manufactured from 2014:

  • Audi TT 2.0 TDI = 210 000 kilometres.

Audi Q7

When to replace the Audi Q7 timing belt

The Audi Q7 is Audi's largest SUV. This model comes with both petrol and diesel engines. Below is an overview of the timing belt replacement intervals. If you don't know which engine your car has, you can enter the registration number below.

Petrol variants produced from 2006 onwards:

  • Audi Q7 (4L) 3.0 TFSI quattro = Timing chain;
  • Audi Q7 (4L) 3.6 FSI = Timing chain;
  • Audi Q7 (4L) 4.2 FSI quattro = Timing chain.

Diesel variants produced from 2006 onwards:

  • Audi Q7 (4L) 3.0 TDI = Timing chain;
  • Audi Q7 (4L) 3.0 TDI quattro = Timing chain;
  • Audi Q7 (4L) 4.2 TDI = Timing chain;
  • Audi Q7 (4L) 6.0 TDI = Timing chain.

Audi Q5

When to replace the Audi Q5 timing belt

The Audi Q5 is an Audi SUV in the mid-range segment. This model comes with both petrol and diesel engines. Below is an overview of the timing belt replacement intervals. If you don't know which engine your car has, you can enter the license plate number below.

Petrol variants produced from 2008 onwards:

  • Audi Q5 1.4 TFSI = 210 000 kilometres;
  • Audi Q5 2.0 TFSI quattro = Timing chain;
  • Audi Q5 2.0 TFSI hybrid quattro = Timing chain;
  • Audi Q5 3.0 TFSI quattro = Timing chain;
  • Audi Q5 3.2 FSI quattro = Timing chain;
  • Audi Q5 SQ5 TFSI quattro = Timing chain;

Diesel variants produced from 2008 onwards:

  • Audi Q5 2.0 TDI = 210 000 Kilometre;
  • Audi Q5 2.0 TDI quattro 105W= 210 000 Kilometre;
  • Audi Q5 2.0 TDI quattro 110W= 210 000 Kilometre;
  • Audi Q5 2.0 TDI quattro 125W (up to 2010) = 180 000 Kilometre;
  • Audi Q5 2.0 TDI quattro 125W (from 2010) = 210 000 Kilometre;
  • Audi Q5 2.0 TDI quattro 130W= 210 000 Kilometre;
  • Audi Q5 2.0 TDI quattro 140W= 210 000 Kilometre;
  • Audi Q5 3.0 TDI quattro = Timing chain;
  • Audi Q5 SQ5 TDI quattro = Timing chain;